The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Transformational aspects of e‑Government in Ireland: Issues to be addressed  pp22-30

Orla O'Donnell, Richard Boyle, Virpi Timonen

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

Drawing upon Irish experience, this paper explores some of the key issues to be addressed in using e‑Government effectively to transform public sector organisations. Two case studies are detailed:ROS (Revenue Online Service) and Integrated Service Centres (County Donegal). Policy implications of developments to date and remaining challenges are discussed

 

Keywords: Ireland, e-Government, Concepts, Organisational Transformation, Policy

 

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Journal Article

From e‑Government to e‑Governance? Towards a model of e‑Governance  pp52-62

Matthias Finger, Gaelle Pecoud

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

This paper is conceptual in nature: in it, we seek to identify the current trends of State transformation, combine them with the changes in the new information and communication technologies, and extrapolate this combination into the near future. More precisely, the goal of the paper is to analyse how the New Information and Communication Technologies shape the newly emerging governance mechanisms at local, regional, national, European, and global levels. It furthermore aims at developing a conceptual model in order to understand the evolution towards e‑governance, as well as assessing its positive and negative implications for the State and the society at large. Finally, it compares our model with the currently existing definitions and conceptualisations of e‑governance and e‑government.

 

Keywords: State transformation, e-governance, e-government, e-regulation, e-democracy

 

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Journal Article

Information‑and Communication Technology (ICT) and Local Power Relationships: An Impact Assessment  pp231-240

Philipp Zimmermann, Matthias Finge

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

This paper is grounded in the empirical reality of a growing use of information‑ and communication technologies (ICTs) in public administrations. Generally, ICTs are being introduced in an organization in order to increase operational efficiency, quality, and transparency. But, besides these intended effects, the introduction of ICTs also leads to substantial changes in the power relationships among all involved actors. As a result of ICT‑enhanced operations, some of the actors will increase their power, while others will loose some of their power. This paper therefore studies the implications of ICTs on the power relations in local administration settings.

 

Keywords: Information and communication technology, ICT, local administration, power relationships, stakeholder theory, state transformation, electronic governance

 

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Journal Article

Re‑Imagining Digital Communications at a Large Federal Agency: A Case Study  pp36-46

Mark Weber, Thomas E. Backer, William Trefzger

© Apr 2019 Volume 17 Issue 1, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

A large US government agency undertook a multi‑year systems change effort to re‑imagine its digital communications activities, which are led by communications staff in its numerous sub‑agencies and offices, along with a central coordinating office within this agency. The systems change strategy used draws from the literature on systems change in the private and government sectors, from two previous systems change efforts within the agency, and from input provided by actively engaging and listening to staff at all levels of the agency. The systems change effort resulted in a business model for the coordinating office to use in advancing the agency’s digital activities. It provides a framework for implementing activities more quickly ‑ encouraging experimentation and emerging best practices. A significant result of the systems change effort to date is transformation of the agency’s main website. At the beginning of this process, fewer than 20 percent of users were finding what they were looking for on the site. Currently over 80 percent of users consistently say they found or partially found what they were looking for. Page load times also improved. The coordinating digital communications office also has received a significant budget increase since these improvements took place. Despite limitations on generalizability from this case study, it may be useful for other government agencies when designing similar systems change activities

 

Keywords: Systems change; Diffusion of innovations; Organizational transformation; Business model; Engagement; Stakeholder involvement; Technical assistance and support

 

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Journal Article

Enterprise Architecture Implementation Is a Bumpy Ride: A Case Study in the Norwegian Public Sector  pp79-94

Anne Kristin S. Ajer, Dag Håkon Olsen

© Dec 2019 Volume 17 Issue 2, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp64 - 94

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Abstract

Enterprise architecture (EA) is a widespread approach for the development of new digital solutions in a planned and controlled way for large and complex organisations. EA is also viewed as a prerequisite for the digitalisation of the public sector. However, public sector organisations struggle to implement EA programmes, and research has demonstrated that organisational and managerial issues are critical obstacles to EA implementation. This study aims to increase our understanding of EA implementation in the public sector by investigating the central challenges for EA initiatives and to trace the progress of current EA initiatives in the Norwegian public sector. An additional goal is to disclose some ways to improve the situation. We conducted three interpretive case studies in the hospital, higher education, and labour and welfare sectors. We have identified 28 challenges to the EA initiatives. We find that organisational and technical complexities, as well as a limited understanding of EA and lack of formal EA governance mechanisms, are significant obstacles. Among others, the lack of understanding of EA and its methodology will lead to problems with anchoring the EA approach in the organisation and facilitating the necessary EA arrangements to induce the promised benefits of EA, which are necessary requirements to establish the EA initiative’s legitimacy and foster the organisation’s willingness to implement change. Our study provides four lessons learned for planning and implementing EA initiatives, as follows: #1. It is advisable to take small steps. #2. The use of external consultants should be carefully considered. #3. Formal architectural governance mechanisms are important for legitimacy and enforced use. #4. Executive commitment and understanding of EA are crucial for achieving a sustainable EA initiative. Finally, we find a common evolution of the EA initiatives through the phases of optimism, resistance, decline and finally, reconsolidation of the most persistent ones.

 

Keywords: enterprise architecture, digital transformation, public sector, e-government

 

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Journal Article

Transformation by Design: An Innovative Approach to Implementation of e‑Government  pp8-13

Dan Swedberg, Judith Douglas

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

A new approach is emerging for implementing e‑Government. That approach draws on lessons learned by both “dot.coms” and brick‑and‑mortar (government and commercial) institutions in addressing challenges of the Digital Economy to enable “transformation by design”. “Transformation by design” marries a step‑by‑step approach to changing existing business infrastructure with innovation to accelerate progression toward transformation in the Digital Economy. In doing so, it addresses the competing requirements facing government institutions for simultaneous incremental and radical change posed by e‑Government implementation.

 

Keywords: transformation, incrementalism, digital economy

 

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Journal Article

Using the New Institutional Economics in e‑Government to deliver transformational change  pp127-138

Andy Ellis

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 2, ECEG 2004, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp75 - 146

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Abstract

e‑Government puts demands on government organisations which may require new management frameworks. This paper presents interim findings from a doctoral research study exploring how a framework based on the New Institutional Economics leads to greater understanding and new insights. This paper, which outlines the theory and shows how it has been applied as a practical business tool in an e‑government context, updates the paper presented at the 2004 European Conference on e‑Government.

 

Keywords: Institutional economics, e-Government, transformational change, ICT, education

 

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Journal Article

Public Service Reform through e‑Government: a Case Study of 'e‑Tax' in Japan  pp135-146

Akemi Takeoka Chatfield

© Apr 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp123 - 208

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Abstract

There is a growing interest in the debate over whether or not e‑government has a transformational impact on government performance, governance, and public service, as we addressed this very issue at the 2007 ECEG. However, e‑government research results on the transformational impact are mixed. This may be an apt reflection of either the early stages of e‑government development or the newness of e‑government research field or both. Our research goal as scholars of e‑government must be to penetrate appearances to ascertain whatever lessons and meanings might lie beneath. This paper is an initial attempt toward achieving this goal. The main objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between public service reform through e‑government and actual government performance. We achieve this objective through a multi‑method approach, including a case study of Japan's National Tax Agency (NTA)`s sophisticated e‑government initiative: an integrated "e‑Tax" system networking the NTA with local tax offices throughout Japan. The "E‑Tax" provides a citizen‑centric, online income and other tax returns filing and payment services for individuals and corporations. A preliminary case analysis provides evidence in support of the transformational impact of e‑Tax on NTA performance. This paper makes an important contribution to the growing e‑government research literature on the transformational impact of e‑government particularly on service process reform.

 

Keywords: transformational impact of e-government, public service reform, electronic tax filing, case study, National Tax Agency, Japan

 

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