The Electronic Journal of e-Government aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government
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Journal Article

The Influence of Perceived Characteristics of Innovating on e‑Government Adoption  pp11-20

Lemuria Carter, France Belanger

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

Government agencies around the world are making their services available online. The success of e‑Government initiatives is contingent upon citizens' willingness to adopt these Web‑enabled services. This study uses Moore and Benbasat's (1991) perceived characteristics of innovating constructs to identify factors that influence citizen adoption of e‑Government initiatives. To pilot test our adoption model we administered a survey to 140 undergraduate students at an accredited research university. This paper discusses the results of the study and their implications for research and practice.

 

Keywords: e-Government, electronic government services, diffusion of innovation, adoption

 

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Journal Article

Shaping Policy Discourse in the Public Sphere: Evaluating Civil Speech in an Online Consultation  pp63-72

Christie Hurrell

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Issue on e-Democracy, Editor: Mary Griffiths, pp59 - 98

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Abstract

The ability of the Internet to function as a public sphere, where citizens can come to public agreement and make recommendations that affect government decisions, has recently come under question. The aggressive style of discourse so prevalent in online discussion has been cited as a significant barrier to the deliberative and open discussion necessary for an effective public sphere. This paper focuses on web‑based discussion in an online policy consultation called the Canadian Foreign Policy Dialogue, and examines specific discourse features to evaluate whether the moderated online policy discussion was civil, and whether that civility promoted meaningful interaction among citizens, and between citizens and government. The study results revealed that citizen participants in the dialogue were successful at developing, maintaining, and enforcing norms of civil discourse, and that these norms helped to promote understanding, tolerance, and consensus building. The study also cautions that civil dialogue alone cannot ensure effective communication between governments and citizens.

 

Keywords: Electronic government, public sphere, civility, online discussion, and electronic democracy

 

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Journal Article

Measuring Users' Satisfaction with Malaysia's Electronic Government Systems  pp283-294

Norshidah Mohamed, Husnayati Hussin, Ramlah Hussein

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp209 - 294

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Abstract

The research seeks to measure users' satisfaction and identify the contributors of satisfaction. We used the end‑user computing satisfaction (EUCS) model as the a priori model to measure internal end‑users' satisfaction with Malaysia's electronic government systems. We gathered data from internal end‑users at the level of officers and directors of Malaysia's electronic government systems. Using the structural equation modeling approach, our results show that all five first‑order factors, content, accuracy, timeliness, format and ease of use, explain the contributors of satisfaction. Further, our studies provide the evidence that in Malaysia's electronic government context, end‑users' satisfaction priorities are timeliness, content and accuracy. This paper makes a significant contribution by applying the Information Systems body of knowledge to measure users' satisfaction with Malaysia's electronic government systems, test and validate the EUCS model in the context of Malaysia's electronic government environment. The paper has enhanced our understanding of users' demands for interactions with business, citizens and other government personnel in the Malaysian electronic government environment.

 

Keywords: end-user computing satisfaction, structural equation modeling, confirmatory factor analysis, information systems, electronic government systems

 

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Journal Article

A Model for Document Management in e‑Government Systems Based on Hierarchical Process Folders  pp191-204

Raphael Kunis, Gudula Rünger, Michael Schwind

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

Document management plays a decisive role in modern e‑government applications. As today's authorities have to face the challenge of increasing the efficiency and quality while decreasing the duration of their government processes, a flexible, adaptable document management system is needed for large e‑government applications. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for a document management model that helps to face this challenge. The model is based on two new document management concepts that extend common document management facilities: hierarchical process folders and security levels. A hierarchical process folder mainly consists of files that belong to a government process and includes all documents processed during process execution. The folder grows during execution and contains all versions of changed, existing, and added documents. The process folders can be used in a single authority software system as well as in distributed e‑government software systems. More precisely, this means that the model of hierarchical process folders can be deployed to exchange process folders in whole or in part between authorities to support the execution of distributed hierarchical government processes. We give an example how the application to single authorities and distributed systems is possible by describing the implementation within our distributed e‑ government software system. The application of security levels to documents allows the encryption of documents based on security relevant properties, e. g. user privileges for intra authority security and network classification for inter authority communication. The benefits of our model are at first a centralised data management for all documents of a single or a hierarchical government process. Secondly, a traceable history of all data within government processes, which is very important for the archival storage of the electronic government processes, is provided. Thirdly, the security levels allow a secure intra authority document accessing system and inter authority document communication system.

 

Keywords: electronic government applications, document management systems, hierarchical government processes, interoperability, document processing, e-government security

 

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Journal Article

Attaining Social Value from Electronic Government  pp31-42

Michael Grimsley, Anthony Meehan

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

We define and elaborate a Social Value framework supporting evaluation and attainment of the broader socio‑political and socio‑economic goals that characterise many electronic government initiatives. The key elements of the framework are the willingness of citizens to (positively) recommend an e‑Government service to others, based upon personal trust in the service provider, and personal experience of the service, based upon experience of service provision and outcomes. The validity of the framework is explored through an empirical quantitative study of citizens' experiences of a newly introduced e‑Government system to allocate public social housing. The results of this study include evidence of generic antecedents of trust and willingness to recommend, pointing the way to more general applicability of the framework for designers and managers of electronic government systems.

 

Keywords: electronic government, social value, public value, recommendation, trust, evaluation

 

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Journal Article

A Model of Success Factors for Implementing Local E‑government in Uganda  pp31-46

Robinah Nabafu, Gilbert Maiga

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

Local e‑government enables citizens at all levels to interact with government easily and access services through electronic means. It enables electronic transactions between government departments and the private sector to take place easily and cheaply. Despite these benefits, its implementation in economically and technologically transitioning countries remains problematic. This is largely due to the gap between the existing e‑government implementation models and the local context for these countries. This study attempts to address this problem by describing a model for local e‑government implementation in a transitioning country, Uganda. A field study was used to gather requirements for the model. The results are used to extend an existing model in order to describe a suitable one for Uganda. Basing on the results collected from the field, the research recommends that the extended model for local e‑government implementation should address the dimensions of financial Resource mobilization, ICT infrastructure, training, sensitization, trust and social political factors. The model was validated in a questionnaire based field study

 

Keywords: Electronic government, Local government, success factors, Transitional country, developing country, Traditional local government, e-government implementation models.

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 1 Issue 1 / Mar 2003  pp1‑62

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Editorial

The growth of e‑government over the past few years has been remarkable – all the more so given the miserable experience of e‑business over the same period. Despite the dot.com crash, interest in e‑government is still growing with an increasing number of conferences, publications and special editions of journals dedicated to this topic. That there is a need for regular publications dedicated to this field (and the related field of e‑democracy) is now evident. That a new publication should be electronic is common sense.

With its traditional conservatism, the academy is slowly edging away from the world of print and toward the world of electronic publication. If one thinks about it, a print journal dedicated to e‑business in any of its forms looks increasingly anomalous in this day and age. So the launch of an Electronic Journal of e‑Government is not only timely, but also in keeping with a longer term migration of academic publication away from the tyranny of paper.

Up to now, much of the reluctance to move to electronic publishing in the academic world has had to do with concerns about quality. Established print journals have elaborate peer‑review processes that not only ensure that what is published is high quality, but that also deliver credibility when presented in CVs to promotion boards or a tenure committees. Just about anybody with a basic knowledge of HTML can publish a journal on the web and the result is a great deal of dross masquerading as serious work. However there is no reason why an electronic journal should not apply equally strict standards and carry just as much weight as its paper cousins provided clear reviewing and publications procedures are rigorously applied. Given these, the ease of availability, the speed of dissemination and the relatively low, sometimes zero, access cost for readers create an overwhelming case for this medium. While it would be rash to predict the imminent demise of the printed journal, it is probable that that in ten years time selected sites on the web (or its successor) will, at the very least, be just as prestigious a forum in which to publish.

The Electronic Journal of E‑Government therefore welcomes submissions from contributors in all areas of e‑government and e‑democracy. The editors are particularly concerned that the coverage should be international and the journal will encompass both theoretical papers, empirical research and/or papers describing practice from both the academic and practitioner communities. It is intended to establish this journal as a seminal source of good research and practice information on e‑government.

Finally, while there is a solid and rapidly growing literature on e‑government, e‑democracy is not by any means as well served. For this reason we would particularly welcome articles on e‑democracy and particularly on the potential for and limits of information and communications technologies to make for a more democratic and politically engaged society.

 

Keywords: electronic journal, papers, articles, eGovernment, electronic government, eGovernment methods, eGovernment studies, e-Government

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 2 Issue 1 / Jul 2004  pp1‑74

Editor: Frank Bannister

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

The growth of e‑government over the past few years has been remarkable – all the more so given the miserable experience of e‑business over the same period. Despite the dot.com crash, interest in e‑government is still growing with an increasing number of conferences, publications and special editions of journals dedicated to this topic. That there is a need for regular publications dedicated to this field (and the related field of e‑democracy) is now evident. That a new publication should be electronic is common sense.

With its traditional conservatism, the academy is slowly edging away from the world of print and toward the world of electronic publication. If one thinks about it, a print journal dedicated to e‑business in any of its forms looks increasingly anomalous in this day and age. So the launch of an Electronic Journal of e‑Government is not only timely, but also in keeping with a longer term migration of academic publication away from the tyranny of paper.

Up to now, much of the reluctance to move to electronic publishing in the academic world has had to do with concerns about quality. Established print journals have elaborate peer‑review processes that not only ensure that what is published is high quality, but that also deliver credibility when presented in CVs to promotion boards or a tenure committees. Just about anybody with a basic knowledge of HTML can publish a journal on the web and the result is a great deal of dross masquerading as serious work. However there is no reason why an electronic journal should not apply equally strict standards and carry just as much weight as its paper cousins provided clear reviewing and publications procedures are rigorously applied. Given these, the ease of availability, the speed of dissemination and the relatively low, sometimes zero, access cost for readers create an overwhelming case for this medium. While it would be rash to predict the imminent demise of the printed journal, it is probable that that in ten years time selected sites on the web (or its successor) will, at the very least, be just as prestigious a forum in which to publish.

The Electronic Journal of E‑Government therefore welcomes submissions from contributors in all areas of e‑government and e‑democracy. The editors are particularly concerned that the coverage should be international and the journal will encompass both theoretical papers, empirical research and/or papers describing practice from both the academic and practitioner communities. It is intended to establish this journal as a seminal source of good research and practice information on e‑government.

Finally, while there is a solid and rapidly growing literature on e‑government, e‑democracy is not by any means as well served. For this reason we would particularly welcome articles on e‑democracy and particularly on the potential for and limits of information and communications technologies to make for a more democratic and politically engaged society.

 

Keywords: electronic journal, papers, articles, eGovernment, electronic government, eGovernment methods, eGovernment studies, e-Government

 

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