The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government
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Journal Article

The Influence of Perceived Characteristics of Innovating on e‑Government Adoption  pp11-20

Lemuria Carter, France Belanger

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

Government agencies around the world are making their services available online. The success of e‑Government initiatives is contingent upon citizens' willingness to adopt these Web‑enabled services. This study uses Moore and Benbasat's (1991) perceived characteristics of innovating constructs to identify factors that influence citizen adoption of e‑Government initiatives. To pilot test our adoption model we administered a survey to 140 undergraduate students at an accredited research university. This paper discusses the results of the study and their implications for research and practice.

 

Keywords: e-Government, electronic government services, diffusion of innovation, adoption

 

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Journal Article

Shaping Policy Discourse in the Public Sphere: Evaluating Civil Speech in an Online Consultation  pp63-72

Christie Hurrell

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Issue on e-Democracy, Editor: Mary Griffiths, pp59 - 98

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Abstract

The ability of the Internet to function as a public sphere, where citizens can come to public agreement and make recommendations that affect government decisions, has recently come under question. The aggressive style of discourse so prevalent in online discussion has been cited as a significant barrier to the deliberative and open discussion necessary for an effective public sphere. This paper focuses on web‑based discussion in an online policy consultation called the Canadian Foreign Policy Dialogue, and examines specific discourse features to evaluate whether the moderated online policy discussion was civil, and whether that civility promoted meaningful interaction among citizens, and between citizens and government. The study results revealed that citizen participants in the dialogue were successful at developing, maintaining, and enforcing norms of civil discourse, and that these norms helped to promote understanding, tolerance, and consensus building. The study also cautions that civil dialogue alone cannot ensure effective communication between governments and citizens.

 

Keywords: Electronic government, public sphere, civility, online discussion, and electronic democracy

 

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Journal Article

Measuring Users' Satisfaction with Malaysia's Electronic Government Systems  pp283-294

Norshidah Mohamed, Husnayati Hussin, Ramlah Hussein

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp209 - 294

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Abstract

The research seeks to measure users' satisfaction and identify the contributors of satisfaction. We used the end‑user computing satisfaction (EUCS) model as the a priori model to measure internal end‑users' satisfaction with Malaysia's electronic government systems. We gathered data from internal end‑users at the level of officers and directors of Malaysia's electronic government systems. Using the structural equation modeling approach, our results show that all five first‑order factors, content, accuracy, timeliness, format and ease of use, explain the contributors of satisfaction. Further, our studies provide the evidence that in Malaysia's electronic government context, end‑users' satisfaction priorities are timeliness, content and accuracy. This paper makes a significant contribution by applying the Information Systems body of knowledge to measure users' satisfaction with Malaysia's electronic government systems, test and validate the EUCS model in the context of Malaysia's electronic government environment. The paper has enhanced our understanding of users' demands for interactions with business, citizens and other government personnel in the Malaysian electronic government environment.

 

Keywords: end-user computing satisfaction, structural equation modeling, confirmatory factor analysis, information systems, electronic government systems

 

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Journal Article

Designing Public Service Process Models for Understandability  pp95-111

Priscila Engiel, Renata Araujo, Claudia Cappelli

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper discusses the use of process models as an instrument to promote transparency and communication between public organizations and their clients (citizens). It depicts a way to design public services process models aiming at increasing their understandability. The design is based on a catalogue containing characteristics, operationalizations and mechanisms for designing understandability on public service process models. The use of the catalogue by process analysts and the level of und erstandability acquired by the generated models were evaluated through case studies at a public educational organization. The results show that the proposed catalogue is applicable ‑ process analysts were able to apply it in a reasonable time ‑ and that more simple process models can be obtained, adequate for process explanation for citizens/users.

 

Keywords: Keywords: understandability, desigining public service, organizational transparency, electronic government and democracy

 

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Journal Article

Strategies, Policies and Evaluations of Brazilian Electronic Government  pp136-149

Valeria Esther Nigri Musafir, Christiana Soares de Freitas

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, ECEG2015, Editor: Carl Adams, pp75 - 160

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Abstract

Abstract: The goal of this paper is to analyze the strategic direction of the Brazilian e‑Government Program from 2008 to 2014 associated with the Brazilian ranking on the United Nations e‑Government Survey. Federal government strategic plans from 2008 to 2014 were analyzed based on three categories: e‑services, e‑administration (interoperability, integration; standardization; structuring systems) and e‑democracy (open data and transparency; e‑participation). Semi‑structured interviews were conducted with fifteen government executives responsible for the planning and coordination of public policies in this sector. The research demonstrates that the Brazilian e‑Government Program acquired a more important role in the Brazilian political arena after the protests of June 2013. The ⠜Gabinete Digital⠀ was created and reported directly to the Presidency of the Republic. It has successfully launched many e‑government initiatives that were being developed but were not considered as a priority. Another res earch finding was the emphasis on increasing the supply of e‑services. This was explicitly observed in government strategic planning starting in 2011. As a result, Brazil moved up 33 positions on the online index of the UN Survey from 2010 to 2012. The la st presidential term was more focused on promoting interaction between government and society ⠍ through an increase of transparency, the use of open data by the states and municipalities, and providing access to public information. Brazil rose seven pos itions on the e‑participation index between 2012 and 2014. Despite numerous initiatives, Brazil's e‑government index ranking in the UN Survey is advancing very slowly and still didn⠒t reach the 45th global position it had in 2008, mainly because of low scores on the telecommunication infrastructure and the human capital indexes. These findings can also be verified in the evaluations of e‑government initiatives presented. Our objective was to verify the convergence, effective follow up and achievement of the targets stipulated in the e‑government stra

 

Keywords: Keywords: strategic planning, electronic government, e-government, digital governance, social participation, public policy evaluation

 

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Journal Article

A Model for Document Management in e‑Government Systems Based on Hierarchical Process Folders  pp191-204

Raphael Kunis, Gudula Rünger, Michael Schwind

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

Document management plays a decisive role in modern e‑government applications. As today's authorities have to face the challenge of increasing the efficiency and quality while decreasing the duration of their government processes, a flexible, adaptable document management system is needed for large e‑government applications. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for a document management model that helps to face this challenge. The model is based on two new document management concepts that extend common document management facilities: hierarchical process folders and security levels. A hierarchical process folder mainly consists of files that belong to a government process and includes all documents processed during process execution. The folder grows during execution and contains all versions of changed, existing, and added documents. The process folders can be used in a single authority software system as well as in distributed e‑government software systems. More precisely, this means that the model of hierarchical process folders can be deployed to exchange process folders in whole or in part between authorities to support the execution of distributed hierarchical government processes. We give an example how the application to single authorities and distributed systems is possible by describing the implementation within our distributed e‑ government software system. The application of security levels to documents allows the encryption of documents based on security relevant properties, e. g. user privileges for intra authority security and network classification for inter authority communication. The benefits of our model are at first a centralised data management for all documents of a single or a hierarchical government process. Secondly, a traceable history of all data within government processes, which is very important for the archival storage of the electronic government processes, is provided. Thirdly, the security levels allow a secure intra authority document accessing system and inter authority document communication system.

 

Keywords: electronic government applications, document management systems, hierarchical government processes, interoperability, document processing, e-government security

 

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Journal Article

Attaining Social Value from Electronic Government  pp31-42

Michael Grimsley, Anthony Meehan

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

We define and elaborate a Social Value framework supporting evaluation and attainment of the broader socio‑political and socio‑economic goals that characterise many electronic government initiatives. The key elements of the framework are the willingness of citizens to (positively) recommend an e‑Government service to others, based upon personal trust in the service provider, and personal experience of the service, based upon experience of service provision and outcomes. The validity of the framework is explored through an empirical quantitative study of citizens' experiences of a newly introduced e‑Government system to allocate public social housing. The results of this study include evidence of generic antecedents of trust and willingness to recommend, pointing the way to more general applicability of the framework for designers and managers of electronic government systems.

 

Keywords: electronic government, social value, public value, recommendation, trust, evaluation

 

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Journal Article

A Model of Success Factors for Implementing Local E‑government in Uganda  pp31-46

Robinah Nabafu, Gilbert Maiga

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

Local e‑government enables citizens at all levels to interact with government easily and access services through electronic means. It enables electronic transactions between government departments and the private sector to take place easily and cheaply. Despite these benefits, its implementation in economically and technologically transitioning countries remains problematic. This is largely due to the gap between the existing e‑government implementation models and the local context for these countries. This study attempts to address this problem by describing a model for local e‑government implementation in a transitioning country, Uganda. A field study was used to gather requirements for the model. The results are used to extend an existing model in order to describe a suitable one for Uganda. Basing on the results collected from the field, the research recommends that the extended model for local e‑government implementation should address the dimensions of financial Resource mobilization, ICT infrastructure, training, sensitization, trust and social political factors. The model was validated in a questionnaire based field study

 

Keywords: Electronic government, Local government, success factors, Transitional country, developing country, Traditional local government, e-government implementation models.

 

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