The Electronic Journal of e-Government aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government
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Journal Article

The Ethical Problem of Framing e‑Government in Terms of e‑Commerce  pp73-82

Bernd Carsten Stahl

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Issue on e-Democracy, Editor: Mary Griffiths, pp59 - 98

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Abstract

This paper discusses one aspect of the relationship that the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in business has with the use of ICT in government and administration. It argues that democracies rely on their ethical legitimacy and that framing e‑Government and e‑Democracy in commercial terms can jeopardise this legitimacy. For this purpose the paper distinguishes between e‑Government as service delivery and e‑Democracy as the more radical use of ICT for democratic deliberation and policy formulation. It argues that the commercial paradigm can support some of the moral values underpinning democracy but it can also have a negative effect on them by equating customers and citizens, by likening the political and the economic system and by promoting hidden agendas and ideologies. The conclusion argues that democratic decision makers need to pay attention to these relationships. Otherwise they not only endanger the success of e‑Government and e‑Democracy but may even threaten the basis of the moral legitimacy of democratic forms of government.

 

Keywords: e-Government, e-Democracy, e-Commerce, legitimacy, ethics, morality

 

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Journal Article

Using Business Process Re‑engineering (BPR) for the Effective Administration of Electronic Voting  pp91-98

Alexandros Xenakis, Ann Macintosh

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Issue on e-Democracy, Editor: Mary Griffiths, pp59 - 98

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Abstract

This paper proposes the use of Business Process Re‑engineering (BPR) methods and analysis tools to address the issues arising in the implementation of electronic voting. We consider the electoral process as one which has to be re‑designed in order to effectively accommodate e‑Voting technology. We identify the key areas of e‑Voting where the use of BPR can provide beneficial results.

 

Keywords: e-Voting, e-Democracy, e-Government, elections, procedural security, responsibility

 

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Journal Article

Experiences with Video Streaming of Norwegian Local Government Meetings  pp49-54

Lasse Berntzen

© Jan 2007 Volume 4 Issue 2, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp49 - 94

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Abstract

Video streaming of local government meetings offers transparency. After an experimental phase, video streaming has now become a regular service in several Norwegian municipalities. This paper describes the design, development and implementation of one such video streaming service for a consortium of twelve municipalities. One important goal of this project was to deliver rich user experience without putting additional workload on municipal administrators. Our solution is able to deliver multiple video streams originating from different video sources (cameras), and the user may choose which video streams to view. Video streams are stored and made available for later viewing. An administrative application facilitates linking items on the agenda to relevant video content. A search engine makes it possible to search for video content across municipal borders. The paper also reports on a recent survey conducted among initial users of the video streaming service. The results are discussed, and some areas of future research are proposed.

 

Keywords: transparency, accountability, e-democracy, video streaming, webcasting

 

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Journal Article

On the Road from Consultation Cynicism to Energising e‑Consultation  pp87-94

Simon Stephens Paul McCusker David O'Donnell

© Dec 2006 Volume 4 Issue 2, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp49 - 94

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Abstract

A major concern in recent political discourse is that government has become both isolated from and unresponsive to its citizens. Democracy, by definition, demands a two‑way flow of communication between government and civil society. ICTs have the potential to facilitate such improved flows of communication „ hence, e‑democracy and e‑consultation. This paper initially draws on focus group discussions on the theme of e‑consultation conducted amongst activist citizens on the island of Ireland. High levels of frustration, scepticism and cynicism were expressed on the form, nature and process of extant consultation processes. In follow‑up demonstrations, however, the preliminary findings are much more positive suggesting that the potential exists for using e‑consultation technologies to enhance democratic processes.

 

Keywords: consultation, e-consultation technologies, e-democracy, e-government

 

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Journal Article

Building on Success: The Diffusion of e‑Government in the American States  pp71-82

Hyun Jung Yun, Cynthia Opheim

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine what factors encourage the diffusion of Internet technology, or e‑government, in the American states. Different dimensions of digital technology are examined by investigating the spread of both e‑service and e‑democracy. A longitudinal mixed linear model is used to test the direct effects of states' political, economic, demographic, and ideological factors on the states' efforts to adopt Internet technology over the first seven years of the new millennium. The results indicate that the adoption of Internet technology is a cumulative process; a state's preexisting digitalization is continuously built on progress in expanding the governmental digital services and outreach. States whose leaders are engaged in professional networks are more likely to adopt e‑government. Institutionally powerful governors also encourage the adoption of on‑line technology. The study concludes that the spread of Internet technology in providing services and expanding outreach fits the explanatory analysis of noncontroversial policies that are diffused by a process of emulation. Executive power, leadership, and professional networks reinforce this pattern of emulation.

 

Keywords: e-government, e-service, e-democracy, internet technology, emulation, leadership, professional networks

 

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Journal Article

Bringing Confidence to Electronic Voting  pp14-21

Andreu Riera, Paul Brown

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

Electronic voting (whether it is remote or poll‑site) has a lack of transparency that makes its use controversial. Currently there is a lively debate regarding the deployment of electronic voting systems, with people arguing whether trustworthiness is only achievable by means of the use of backup paper trails. We believe that paper trails are not strictly necessary. In our opinion, the lack of transparency of electronic voting systems can be overcome to a great extent by using adequate security measures (technological, physical and procedural). Such security measures would provide clarity to the process and avoid the need to rely on complex and/or networked systems and/or proprietary closed systems.

 

Keywords: electronic voting, security, trust, e-Democracy

 

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Journal Article

The potential contribution of ICTs to the political process  pp31-39

Briony J Oates

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

This paper discusses the potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to help engage people in all parts of the political process: obtaining information, engaging in deliberation and participating in decision‑making. It also discusses limitations or barriers to using ICTs in these ways. Despite these limitations ICTs are likely to be increasingly tried in the political process. It is therefore important that we educate our young people for participation in an e‑enabled political process. The paper therefore reports on an educational project that demonstrated using ICTs in the political process and introduced some 13‑14 year olds to citizenship and electronic democracy, concentrating on a local mayoral election. The responses of the participants raise interesting issues about how to use ICTs in education and the desirability, or otherwise, of electronic electioneering. The paper contributes to our understanding and experience of citizenship education, e‑democracy and the use of ICTs in the political process.

 

Keywords: e-democracy, e-government, e-electioneering, citizenship education

 

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Journal Article

From e‑Government to e‑Governance? Towards a model of e‑Governance  pp52-62

Matthias Finger, Gaelle Pecoud

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

This paper is conceptual in nature: in it, we seek to identify the current trends of State transformation, combine them with the changes in the new information and communication technologies, and extrapolate this combination into the near future. More precisely, the goal of the paper is to analyse how the New Information and Communication Technologies shape the newly emerging governance mechanisms at local, regional, national, European, and global levels. It furthermore aims at developing a conceptual model in order to understand the evolution towards e‑governance, as well as assessing its positive and negative implications for the State and the society at large. Finally, it compares our model with the currently existing definitions and conceptualisations of e‑governance and e‑government.

 

Keywords: State transformation, e-governance, e-government, e-regulation, e-democracy

 

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