The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Does the Internet help to overcome social exclusion?  pp139-146

Paul Foley

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 2, ECEG 2004, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp75 - 146

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Abstract

This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the take‑up and impact of ICT amongst socially excluded groups. 130 people took part in 20 focus group discussions. The study: Investigated the factors that influence the adoption and use of the Internet by socially excluded groups; Identified tangible economic and social benefits arising from having access and making use of the Internet; Recommends policies and future action concerning the targeting of resources and the design and likely success of current interventions to promote Internet use. The study shows that some clear and quantifiable benefits can arise from Internet access by socially excluded groups. If the level of use of online information is used as a surrogate for beneficial impact amongst socially excluded groups it is apparent that the Internet is not just providing wider opportunities; these opportunities are actively being seized by socially excluded groups.

 

Keywords: Social exclusion, digital divide, Internet use, policy impact, benefits of ICT

 

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Journal Article

Experimenting with Electronic Voting Registration: The Case of Belgium  pp59-62

Bruno de Vuyst, Alea M. Fairchild

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Issue on e-Democracy, Editor: Mary Griffiths, pp59 - 98

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Abstract

The paper describes the introduction of experimental systems of electronic voting registration in Belgium, one of the first European countries (along with The Netherlands) to venture in this direction. The 1991 introduction of electronic voting registration has still not resulted in any form of electronic distance voting. Examination of criticism of the automatisation of voter registration focuses on a perceived lack of attainment of policy objectives of manpower and cost reduction, speed and accuracy; yet despite this criticism, there is no debate on electronic voting registration, unlike in the U.S.

 

Keywords: Electronic voting, policy, distance voting, law

 

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Journal Article

Policy Recommendations for Electronic Public Procurement  pp99-108

Ramanathan Somasundaram, Jan Damsgaard

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp99 - 156

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Abstract

The role played by governmental institutions for accelerating the diffusion of electronic public procurement (e‑PP) is analyzed in this paper. Such analysis is interesting for institutions encouraging the diffusion of e‑Government because they are not objective third party intermediaries instead they are part of the government. The paper is written based on an embedded case study carried out to enquire the challenges faced by the Danish public sector in the diffusion of e‑procurement. The actions taken by the ministry of science, technology and innovation in Denmark are analyzed under the following sections; knowledge building, knowledge deployment, subsidy, mobilization, standard setting and innovation directive. The analysis yields six conjectures and it shows that as public administration is politically managed, the Danish government seeks mainly to influence and not regulate the supply and demand sides. A regulatory action may be misinterpreted as a move to alter power structures within the public administration.

 

Keywords: e-procurement, e-Government, public sector, diffusion, policy, inter-organizational systems and institutions

 

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Journal Article

e‑Voting: Same Pilots, Same Problems, Different Agendas  pp205-212

Mark Liptrott

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

This paper outlines the preliminary findings of the empirical stage of the research to establish the reasons that in 2003 some English local authorities decided to trial e‑voting and others did not. The key findings demonstrate that central and local governments have different agendas and there is little momentum from central government to increase the number of pilot schemes. The central government policy to introduce e‑voting via voluntary pilot schemes is only providing a limited insight into the problems surrounding the operation of the new voting methods. The findings are derived from comparative semi‑structured interviews with Election Officers from pilot and non‑pilot authorities, and the analysis is based upon Rogers' diffusion of innovations theory framework. The findings illustrate that in the case of e‑voting, central government has not adopted a formal diffusion strategy and that a most influential driver to adopt e‑voting is not prominently acknowledged in diffusion theory. The results suggest that the theory of perceived attributes needs modification and the issue of the diffusion of a public policy should be considered by government earlier in the public policy process.

 

Keywords: e-voting, pilot scheme, public policy process, diffusion

 

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Journal Article

Citizens4Citizens: Mapping Participatory Practices on the Internet  pp99-112

Albert Meijer, Nils Burger, Wolfgang Ebbers

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Many important forms of public participation take place in interactions between citizens. Studying these interactions is crucial for understanding e‑governance, defined as steering in the public domain. The new forms of public participations can be labeled Citizens2Citizens interactions (C2C). Citizens use the Internet to facilitate policy participation (meant to support or undermine government policies), political participation (directed at influencing political decision‑making and agenda‑setting) and social participation (to increase social capital). Attention for these forms of digital participation coincides with the rise of a new set of Web applications which are grouped under the label 'Web 2.0'. This paper is an attempt to conceptualize and categorize the wide variety of types and forms of C2C to provide a basis for a further development of this new research field. We do not claim that our exploration will lead to a final and complete description of C2C; we merely aim to present an overview of the diversity of forms of C2C initiatives that are taking place in the digital world. The argument we are putting forward is that new technologies offer new venues for participating and that these new practices will constitute both a replication of and an addition to existing offline practices of public participation. Our explorative research of C2C initiatives results in a map of political, policy and social participation. This map of C2C initiatives can provide insights in the variety of Internet practices and help subsequent researches in their selection of initiatives for in‑depth studies. Additionally, our research results in an exploration of the implications the analyzed initiatives can have for participation in the public sector.

 

Keywords: political participation, policy participation, social participation, e-governance

 

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Journal Article

Case Study: e‑Youth City Council Project an Alternative e‑Government for Young People  pp349-360

Gemma Gibert i Font

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

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Abstract

This article presents an explanatory analysis of an e‑ Youth City Council project held in the town of Sant Andreu de Llavaneres, Catalonia, during the year 2008. The main objectives of this programme were to increase citizen participation, improve good governance and through it, the possibility of consolidating and strengthening democracy by ICT use. This case study was based on a survey of 628 young people aged between 14 and 18. The aim was to motivate and enable them to play an active role in politics and to take up positions of genuine authority and responsibility, within local decision making, as pre‑voting citizens. In this way, the young people engaged to develop all stages of the electoral process, participated in an e‑voting system and were empowered in local government for 15 days. In this case polity was translated into practice and created a successful partnership between young citizens and the local political parties. The focus of this ICT research was, basically, which tools the youngsters used and the influence it had on electorate participation In this way, the ICT acquired a new perspective relating to this study group who are considered a generation raised in a computerised era and who are leaders in the fields of innovation and communication, used as a common tool in their social life and work. The analysis is described and evaluated by explanatory variables such as; population, age, ICT use and access, number of voters and abstentions, the ajuntamentjove.cat website , political party blogs, electoral campaign spots and meetings, the electronic voting system and finally the video " Youth Government Constitution" broadcast by internet into the school classroom. Electronic voting has been incorporated as a pilot test, consisting of a voting system of closed lists with a choice of up to two preferential candidates.

 

Keywords: e-government, young citizens, participation, ICT, democracy and policy, e-voting

 

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Journal Article

A Multi‑Level Framework for ICT‑Enabled Governance: Assessing the Non‑Technical Dimensions of 'Government Openness'  pp152-165

Misuraca Gianluca, Alfano, Giuseppe, Viscusi, Gianluigi

© Dec 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ECEG, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp93 - 222

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Abstract

This paper proposes an interpretative framework which aims to provide a systemic perspective and an instrument to elicit the links between Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and governance, outlining the various challenges that this poses . In particular, it discusses the multiple dimensions of governance and identifies the public value drivers underpinning the conceptual and measurement framework proposed. In doing so the paper focuses on the 'openness' of governance mechanisms through it s interoperability dimension. It considers state‑of‑the‑art contributions at both academic and practitioner level and it also looks at how the proposed framework can be applied to the evaluation of two case studies at cross‑border, and national‑city level in Europe. Interoperability in fact is predominantly seen as an instrument for enabling cross‑border collaboration between public administrations within and between different Member States. Many initiatives and projects have been promoted and carried out during the last decade resulting in a growing number of potentially reusable best practices and benchmarks. Nevertheless, the complexity and volume of resulting project outcomes represent a challenge for effective exploitation of the results in other ini tiatives and intervention contexts. Moreover, despite the recognition of interoperability as a multi‑faceted concept (i.e. technological, organizational, and semantic), it seems to be mainly the technological aspects of interoperability that emerge from the available project results. The paper concludes outlining indications for future research and in particular on interoperability as a key driver for ICT‑enabled governance. Interoperability is found to play a strategic role in the delivery of e‑Governm ent services to local and national communities within the EU. Moreover, its significance is expected to increase over the next few years, especially in terms of how it supports emerging city governance models and acts as the backbone of communications at a pan‑European, national and local level.

 

Keywords: interoperability, eGovernance, information systems, Europe, policy, value

 

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Journal Article

Measuring the Public value of e‑Government: The eGEP2.0 model  pp373-388

Alberto Savoldelli et al

© Dec 2013 Volume 11 Issue 2, ECEG 2013, Editor: Frank Bannister & Walter Castelnovo, pp324 - 388

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Abstract

Abstract: After having briefly introduced the issue of measuring e‑Government vis‑à‑vis its impact evaluation, the paper provides an overview of the state of the art with regard to measurement of e‑Government, addressing the debate on the relationship bet ween 'public value' creation and e‑Government, outlining some of the approaches advanced to measure the public value of ICT interventions in the public sector. In light of this discussion, the paper then proposes the eGEP‑2.0 model which, building on its predecessor eGEP, overcome many of the limitations of existing frameworks, and more importantly pave the way for an effective impact assessment of e‑Government initiatives, in relation to the policy‑making process and related governance needed for their d esign and implementation. The results of the application of the eGEP‑2.0 model on the Telematics and Informatics Plan (PiTER) of the Emilia Romagna Region in Italy are then presented and discussed. The paper concludes providing some reflections on the e xperience and outlining future research challenges.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-government, measurement, evaluation, public value, policy-making

 

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