The Electronic Journal of e-Government aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government
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Journal Article

Communication and Culture: Designing a Knowledge‑enabled Environment to Effect Local Government Reform  pp159-168

Vivien Reid, Barbara Bardzki, Stephen McNamee

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp147 - 218

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Abstract

Knowledge sharing processes and an appropriate infrastructure are key elements to successful Knowledge Management (KM) initiatives but culture is paramount. In a public sector context, where organisational structures tend to be hierarchical and complex, implementing effective KM is a difficult task. Central to the success of such initiatives are culture, trust, loyalty or solidarity and a supportive communication climate.

 

Keywords: knowledge local government culture communication trust

 

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Journal Article

An Exploratory Evaluation of UK Local e‑Government From an Accountability Perspective  pp13-28

Dave Griffin, Eddie Halpin

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

This paper provides an initial exploration of the relationship between electronic service delivery and public accountability. Specifically, it investigates public accountability for the implementation of electronic local government. Based on empirical research with council officers and elected members, it proposes a initial evaluation framework for local e‑Government accountability. It examines the practice of e‑Government accountability using this framework.

 

Keywords: e-Government, evaluation, public accountability, local government, scrutiny

 

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Journal Article

e‑Local Government in New Zealand: The Shifting Policymaker View  pp9-18

Stuart Dillon, Eric Deakins, Wan Jung Chen

© Dec 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 48

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Abstract

The New Zealand government has a strategy in place to establish an e‑government infrastructure that is intended to allow citizens and government agencies to interact electronically. This paper reports the results of a longitudinal study designed to track the development of e‑local government initiatives in New Zealand since 2000. Identical surveys conducted four years apart show heightened recognition by policy makers of sixteen key policy issues judged vital for e‑government success; as well as increasing sophistication of local authority websites. The results also indicate that, while the majority of NZ e‑government websites appear to have been created to provide information to citizens, there remain many opportunities to use such a vehicle strategically. It is anticipated these results will be of interest both to local and central government policy makers, and to other e‑government researchers.

 

Keywords: governmental issues, e-government, local government, policy

 

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Journal Article

The Effectiveness of e‑Service in Local Government: A Case Study  pp157-166

Mehdi Asgarkhani

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

e‑Technology has become a catalyst for enabling more effective government through better access to services and the democratic process. As public interest in the Internet and e‑Technology solutions continues to grow, there is an increasing expectation that they will be utilised in national and local governments for not only more efficient governance but also improving public access to information and services. This paper, based on a case study discusses some of the key aspects of electronic government and e‑Service. It examines the value and the effectiveness of e‑Services within the public sector with a focus on four specific facets of effectiveness: the view of management and ICT strategists; social, cultural and ethical implications; the implications of lack of access to ICT; and the customers'citizens' view of the usefulness and success of e‑Service initiatives.

 

Keywords: e-Technologies, e-Service, e-Government, e-Readiness, Local Government

 

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Journal Article

e‑Government in Greece: Bridging the gap Between Need and Reality  pp185-192

Panos Hahamis, Jennifer Iles, Mike Healy

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

Currently in Greece, the Operational Programme for the Information Society (OPIS) is promoting ICT in the public sector. However, a content study of Greek government websites reveals that at local level e‑Government has generally not progressed beyond the information presentation stage. The findings of an online survey of government employees and interviews with key government officials suggest reasons for this. Recommendations are made for facilitating the development and implementation of full interactive local e‑Government.

 

Keywords: Information society, e-Government, EU, Greece, public sector, local government

 

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Journal Article

Stages of Growth in e‑Government: An Architectural Approach  pp193-200

Marijn Janssen, Anne Fleur van Veenstra

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

Governmental agencies from all over the world are in various stages of development to migrate their traditional systems architectures to more horizontally and vertically integrated architectures. In this paper a stages of growth model for the development of information architectures for local governmental agencies is presented. By analyzing discontinuities in the architectures coordinating back and front office applications five stages are derived. The five‑stage model consists of 1) no integration, 2) one‑to‑one messaging, 3) warehouse, 4) broker and 5) orchestrated broker architecture. Public decision‑makers can use these stages as a guidance and direction in architecture development, to reduce the complexity of the progression of e‑government initiatives, to communicate changes to the rest of the organization and to provide milestones to evaluate and control cost of architecture development.

 

Keywords: Information architecture, local government, stage models, coordination, information broker, web service orchestration

 

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Journal Article

e‑Administration, e‑Government, e‑Governance and the Learning City: A typology of Citizenship management using ICTs  pp213-218

Hélène Michel

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

Citizenship implies a certain model of relationship between citizens and their government. This type of relationship can be conceived in several ways. Citizenship can be presented in the form of an object to be governed in various ways. Using a two year research‑action study in the town of Vandoeuvre (France), we elaborated a typology of citizenship management using Information and Computer Technologies composed of four modes: E‑administration, E‑ government, E‑governance and "The Learning City". In the "e‑administration" mode, the citizen is considered as a « consumer of rights » claiming personalized and efficient public services. It corresponds to a government « for the people » with a strategy of citizen satisfaction improvement. The second mode, that we call "e‑government" reflects a vision of a relatively passive citizen‑agent, who responds to his duties. Based on the need of quantifying and comparing solutions, this government of the people relies on regular consultations in order to improve the policy's acceptance. In this perspective, electronic voting is the most appropriate tool, because it facilitates the communication of citizens' opinions to government, while conserving a consultative characteristic. In the "e‑governance" mode, the citizen is considered an active agent of local democracy. The citizen is now considered as a source of ideas and initiatives that provides a mutual enrichment. The e‑governance model can launch a reflection on the local government's knowledge management capacity. This could then result in a fourth type of the citizen relationship management, which would not be a government of the people, for the people or by the people, but according to the people. We called this mode "the Learning City". The logic underlying this approach would be: "learn how to learn", defining a range of possible actions, choosing the decision corresponding to the criteria considered to be essential to the success. The citizens would at the same time be actors and determinants of the rules. The role of the local officials and the corresponding ICT tools remain to be imagined.

 

Keywords: e-Administration, e-Government, e-Governance, learning organization, Citizen Relationship Management, local government, ICT

 

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Journal Article

Using SMS Texting to Encourage Democratic Participation by Youth Citizens: a Case Study of a Project in an English Local Authority  pp79-86

David Griffin, Philippa Trevorrow, Edward Halpin, Edward Halpin

© Dec 2006 Volume 4 Issue 2, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp49 - 94

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Abstract

Public administrations across Europe take the view that using digital media for consultation with citizens will help to increase their democratic participation. In the UK, the Government has encouraged local authorities to experiment with new electronic communication channels for this purpose. This paper presents a case study in which one such medium, the mobile phone, is being used in an attempt to raise participation amongst young people. It evaluates a project set up to use SMS text messaging as a means of electronic consultation with young people by a council in the North of England. Specifically, it examines the effect of text messaging on democratic participation by the young and the effect of this type of consultation on the processes of the political administration. This case study identifies a number of organizational, social and cultural issues that may limit the scope for using this technology to increase youth participation and change the relationship between young people and their local elected representatives. Based on the initial evidence from this case study, we take the cyber‑sceptic stance. We suggest that the mobile phone is not the 'silver bullet' for invigorating consultation with young people by the local public administration. We identify a series of potential barriers to increasing participation by youth and changing the relationship between the elected politicians and their constituents.

 

Keywords: e-Democracy, e-Consultation, local government, young people, mobile telephony, case study

 

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